G6pd List Of Foods And Drugs To Avoid Pdf

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Glucosephosphate dehydrogenase G6PD is a substance that helps the body use sugar for energy.

G6PD deficiency is a genetic disorder that mostly affects males of Asian, African or Mediterranean origin. It happens when the body doesn't have enough of an enzyme called glucosephosphate dehydrogenase G6PD , which is responsible for keeping red blood cells healthy. Most people who have G6PD deficiency are healthy, but sometimes fever or certain medicines and foods can break down their red blood cells haemolysis and cause anaemia.

7 Things You Should Avoid If You Have G6PD Deficiency

Glucosephosphate dehydrogenase G6PD is a substance that helps the body use sugar for energy. It is an enzyme, which means it speeds up chemical changes when the body converts sugar to energy. These are the cells that contain hemoglobin and carry oxygen throughout the body. The G6PD enzyme protects the red blood cells from harmful chemicals or toxins, which can build up in your body during certain illnesses or after taking some medicines.

Normally, there are only tiny amounts of toxins in the body, and so it is not usually a problem for the G6PD enzyme to make them harmless. If G6PD is not present, strong chemical products are not neutralized and they can damage the hemoglobin inside red blood cells. A build-up of toxins or chemicals can cause the red blood cells to break apart and be destroyed also known as hemolysis.

This makes a person anemic reduced levels of hemoglobin and red blood cells. Sometimes the anemia can happen very quickly. Hemolysis may lead to severe anemia and can cause jaundice a yellowing of the skin from the build-up of hemoglobin breakdown products in the blood. Some infants who experience jaundice have G6PD deficiency.

Fortunately, once the cause or trigger is removed, hemolysis usually stops within a short period of time. G6PD deficiency is a genetic condition that is caused by an alteration a mutation or a change in the G6PD gene. This mutation prevents the production of the normal enzyme. The mutation is passed on in families in an X-linked recessive pattern.

This means that the gene that codes for the G6PD enzyme is located on the X-chromosome; males have one X chromosome and females have two. When a female inherits a gene for G6PD deficiency she is referred to as a carrier because she has a second normal copy of the gene from the other parent that can often compensate for the altered gene.

Female carriers may or may not experience symptoms of G6PD deficiency. Men with G6PD deficiency do not pass the gene on to any of their sons; however, all of their daughters will be carriers.

Often a mother has no symptoms and has no way of knowing that she is a carrier of G6PD deficiency. G6PD deficiency can occur in a person from any ethnic group. Many people can go through life without any symptoms. It only becomes a problem if the person is exposed to certain chemical compounds or toxins, or experiences certain infections that can cause hemolysis.

People with G6PD deficiency have an increased risk of hemolysis and severe anemia if they have certain infections such as Fifth disease parvovirus , infectious hepatitis, infectious mononucleosis mono , pneumonia, or a blood infection. In some people with G6PD deficiency, a small amount of red blood cell destruction occurs all the time.

Usually a person with chronic hemolysis makes more than the average amount of red blood cells to make up for the ones that are being constantly destroyed.

The retic count is usually elevated in a person with chronic hemolysis. This means the body is keeping up with the demands for red blood cells and hemoglobin. For persons with the form of G6PD deficiency that is associated with chronic hemolysis, their doctor may prescribe a medication called folic acid. This vitamin supplement helps the bone marrow keep up with the increased production demands needed to make the extra red blood cells. The symptoms of hemolysis and the resulting anemia may include tiredness, paleness, headache, yellow tint to the whites of the eyes or skin jaundice or icterus , fast heartbeat, shortness of breath, or dark urine tea or coke colored.

Individuals with these symptoms should inform their healthcare provider promptly. You cannot prevent G6PD deficiency, but fortunately, if you avoid exposure to certain medicines and foods, you can prevent the more serious symptoms.

Fava beans is one of the foods you should always avoid. Any time persons with G6PD take any medication, whether prescribed by a doctor or over-the-counter, they should tell their doctor or pharmacist that they have G6PD deficiency to be sure that it is safe to take the medication.

The common over-the-counter treatments for fever, pain, nasal congestion and cough — acetaminophen Tylenol , ibuprofen Advil , pseudoephedrine Sudafed , and guaifenesin, Robitussin — are usually safe at normal therapeutic doses for people with G6PD deficiency. People with G6PD deficiency should avoid medicines that contain aspirin salicylic acid.

Learn about all the foods and medications to avoid. As a center of excellence in the treatment of bleeding and clotting disorders, the IHTC offers a high level of coordinated care for patients with this disorder.

We also provide prompt communication with your local healthcare provider related to our treatment plan and your progress. The IHTC team collaborates with national experts and patient participation in research studies may be available. We can help you with diagnosis, testing and treatment; and can provide expert dietary guidance suitable for your specific needs.

If you are in the U. If you are outside of the U. A genetic deficiency that can lead to anemia Glucosephosphate dehydrogenase G6PD is a substance that helps the body use sugar for energy. So, what is the problem? Chronic Hemolysis In some people with G6PD deficiency, a small amount of red blood cell destruction occurs all the time. Special Considerations: What to Avoid You cannot prevent G6PD deficiency, but fortunately, if you avoid exposure to certain medicines and foods, you can prevent the more serious symptoms.

Medications: What to Take, What to Avoid Any time persons with G6PD take any medication, whether prescribed by a doctor or over-the-counter, they should tell their doctor or pharmacist that they have G6PD deficiency to be sure that it is safe to take the medication.

G6PD deficiency

Although most individuals are asymptomatic, it can lead to acute haemolytic anaemia with malaise, neonatal jaundice and haemoglobinuria in the presence of oxidative triggers. In our study, we also noted that there was no synthesized evidence on the roles of food and chemicals these individuals. We considered all study designs as long as they reported clinical outcomes along with indicators of haemolysis. Only 38 articles, describing 14 different types of food or chemical, were found a full list of the articles retrieved can be obtained by contacting S. This food additive has subsequently been banned in many countries, which may account for the paucity of report on it in recent years. Nevertheless, we urge caution while consuming any food which contains a high concentration of this agent in view of the potential for haemolysis and toxicity 7.

Please note that there are more than genetic variants of the deficiency. G6PD deficiency is most common in males of African heritage. Many females of African heritage are carriers of G6PD deficiency, meaning they can pass the gene for the deficiency to their children but do not have symptoms; only a few are actually affected by G6PD deficiency. People of Mediterranean heritage, including those of Italian, Greek, Arabic, and Sephardic Jewish backgrounds, also are commonly affected. The severity of G6PD deficiency varies among these groups — it tends to be milder in those of African heritage and more severe in people of Mediterranean descent. Why does G6PD deficiency happen more often in certain groups of people? It is known that Africa and the Mediterranean basin are high-risk areas for the infectious disease malaria.

G6PD deficiency

G6PD deficiency is a genetic abnormality that results in an inadequate amount of glucosephosphate dehydrogenase G6PD in the blood. This is a very important enzyme or protein that regulates various biochemical reactions in the body. G6PD is also responsible for keeping red blood cells healthy so they can function properly and live a normal life span. Without enough of it, red blood cells break down prematurely.

Glucosephosphate dehydrogenase deficiency G6PDD is an inborn error of metabolism that predisposes to red blood cell breakdown. It is an X-linked recessive disorder that results in defective glucosephosphate dehydrogenase enzyme. Affected persons must avoid dietary triggers, [3] notably fava beans.

What G6PD‐deficient individuals should really avoid

Fortunately, most people with G6PD deficiency do not have problems on a daily basis. However, there are certain medications or foods that increase the rate of red blood cell breakdown. Let's review some of the common things that can cause problems in this blood disorder. Antibiotics referred to as "sulfa" drugs should be avoided.

G6PD deficiency can cause haemolysis and anaemia. Learn what this has to do with blood, the problems it can cause and what medicines you should avoid. Glucosephosphate dehydrogenase G6PD is an enzyme that helps red blood cells to work properly.


Acetylsalicylic acid. (Aspirin). • Acetanilide. • Paracetamol. (Acetaminophen). • Aminophenazone. (Aminopyrine). • Dipyrone. (Metamizole). • Phenacetin.


G6PD Deficiency

Red blood cells are needed to deliver oxygen from the lungs to other parts of the body. Glucosephosphate dehydrogenase G6PD is an enzyme that protects red blood cells. Some people do not have enough G6PD to protect their red blood cells. People with G6PD deficiency are at higher risk for red blood cell destruction. When anemia happens, there are not enough red blood cells in the body to carry oxygen normally.

G6PD is important in protecting red blood cells. The lack of G6PD can lead to red blood cells breaking down too easily haemolysis when the person is exposed to certain triggers, which are usually certain foods, viruses or medications. The red blood cells carry oxygen around the body, and the excessive breakdown of red blood cells can lead to anaemia, which can cause pale skin and lethargy.

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